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Past Issues

Candidate Information Workshop

Posted On: Sunday, January 28, 2018

Saturday May 5, 2018, 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Beaver Valley Community Centre, Thornbury

Candidate Information Workshop

Reserve a spot by email to  townclerk@thebluemountains.ca

 

FROM AMO - Associations of Municipalities Ontario  

When are local elections held? 
The next municipal election will be held Monday, October 22, 2018. The last municipal election was held on October 27, 2014.  Those thinking they have a future career in municipal politics can file nomination papers from Tuesday, May 1, 2018 up until 2 p.m. on Friday, July 27, 2018.

The Legislative Assembly of Ontario legislation (Bill 81, Schedule H), passed in 2006, set the length of terms in office for all municipal elected officials at four years. 

Think about all the services your municipal government is responsible for providing.  
Roads. Public transit. Child Care. Local policing. Water and sewers. Ambulances. Parks. Recreation.  
Learn who in your community best represents your position on the issues that mean the most to you and your family.  

Who can vote in the elections? 
Anyone can vote in a municipal election who, on the day of the election, is: 

  • 18 years of age or older 
  • a Canadian citizen; and 
  • either a resident of the municipality or a property owner or tenant or the spouse or same sex partner of an owner or tenant in the municipality during a specified time just before the election.  

To be able to vote, your name must be on the list of eligible voters.  If you are on the voters list, you should receive a card in late October telling you that you are eligible to vote. If you think you are eligible to vote, but have not received your card, call your municipality to find out what to do in order to vote. 

Who can be a candidate? 
Generally, anyone who is eligible to vote may be a candidate for a position on a municipal council.  

When you think about candidates for federal or provincial elections, you usually think about the political party that each candidate represents. In municipal elections in Ontario, candidates are not elected to represent a political party.  

Election Calendar  (Source: Ministry of Municipal Affairs)
Changes to the election calendar reflect recommendations from the public, municipal councils and municipal staff to shorten the election campaign period. The first day that nominations can be filed for a regular election will be May 1st. Nomination day (the deadline to file a nomination) for a regular election will move to the fourth Friday in July (July 27, for the 2018 election).

A number of other deadlines related to regular elections have also changed:

  • The deadline for a municipality to pass a by-law to place a question on the ballot has moved to March 1st in an election year. The deadline for other questions (e.g. a school board, a minister’s question) will be May 1st.
  • The deadline to pass by-laws authorizing the use of alternative voting, such as by mail or by internet, and vote counting equipment will be May 1st in the year before the election (e.g., May 1, 2017 for the 2018 election).
  • The clerk will need to have procedures and forms related to alternative voting and vote counting equipment in place by December 31st in the year before the election.

Ontario Votes election data.
Total Council seats:  3,306  (444 municipal governments in Ontario)
In 2010, 7,071 candidates ran, of which 1,591 were women (22.5%).
In 2010, 8,039 candidates ran, of which 1,495 were women (18.5%).

AMO congratulates the 1,271 returning members and 1,598 new members of council. That equates to almost 56% new faces of 2,869 elected positions, compared to 44% in 2010. The percentage of women elected is 21.6% compared to 26% for the 2010-2014 term.

Some notable statistics also include:

  • Average voter turnout is 43.12 (389 municipalities reporting)
  • Largest voter turnout 86.63% - Town of Latchford, lowest 15.81% - Town of Petawawa (389 municipalities reporting)
  • 17 municipalities entire council acclaimed
  • 3 municipalities had partial council entirely acclaimed, 2 of which do not have a head of council and one of which does not have the 4th council member. The vacancies are to be dealt with at the first council meeting in December.
  • 78 female heads of council
  • 96 new councillors and heads of council took AMO's So You Want To Run For Council online course
  • 10 municipalities had referendum questions
  • 12 municipalities reduced their size of council
  • 4 municipalities increased their size of council
  • The Ontario Votes site was a great success and had over 119,000 pageviews

read all news


Municipal Events
Upcoming Events
24
February

Location: Marsh Street Centre

28
February

Location: L.E. Shore Memorial Library, 173 Bruce St. S.

01
March

Location: L.E. Shore Gallery, 173 Bruce St. S, Thornbury

02
March

Location: L. E. Shore Library

03
March

Location: L. E. Shore Gallery, 173 Bruce St. S, Thornbury

08
March

Location: The Cheese Gallery 11 Bruce st.

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